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So what should my mobile network type be for 4G?
sandyinmiami
Member
After the outage, I have 3G but haven't had a single instance of 4G yet. I didn't do the fix while it was down, and I've read lots of threads about the various problems. But I'm confused as to what my Mobile Network Type is actually supposed to say in order to get 4G. Mine is set on CDMA - EvDo rev. A.

Is that what it should be and any suggestions as to how to get back my 4G access?

Thanks in advance.
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Re: So what should my mobile network type be for 4G?
RoyB_VZW
Sr. Member

All 4G service has been restored, nationwide. The Thunderbolt does not have a setting to turn on and off the LTE radio, but it does have options to turn data on and off. This is done by choosing: Settings > Wireless and Networks > Mobile Network. Also, ensure that all three items are check-marked.

 

If this does not restore 4G and you are in a known covered area, please feel free to contact us for additional troubleshooting. 

 

Thanks, 

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Re: So what should my mobile network type be for 4G?
RoyB_VZW
Sr. Member

All 4G service has been restored, nationwide. The Thunderbolt does not have a setting to turn on and off the LTE radio, but it does have options to turn data on and off. This is done by choosing: Settings > Wireless and Networks > Mobile Network. Also, ensure that all three items are check-marked.

 

If this does not restore 4G and you are in a known covered area, please feel free to contact us for additional troubleshooting. 

 

Thanks, 

View solution in original post

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Re: So what should my mobile network type be for 4G?
Ann154
Expert
Expert
The 3G network on the Thunderbolt was set up as eHPRD when the my phone was activated. After the outage I am still on the EDVO Rev A version of the network. I did do the fix during the outage to get off the 1x. After 4G LTE was restored, I switched the setting back to eHPRD enabled. I have not been able to actually get eHPRD since then. I don't live in an area with 4G LTE around.

The LTE OnOff app will allow you to switch between CDMA + LTE/EDVO Auto and CDMA PRL (Auto)

I'm most definitely NOT a VZW employee. If a post answered your question, please mark it as the answer.

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Re: So what should my mobile network type be for 4G?
PJNC284
Sr. Member

yeah, I don't think it's 100% fixed.  Contrary to what Verizon wants us to think.  eHRPD prior to the outage and Rev A afterwards. Fixed? I think not.  Rev-A fix or not, dental patient or not.  Doesn't really seem to be a pattern between those that are getting Rev A in 3G areas.  Maybe I'll get all the files downloaded and completely reset my phone back to stock while I'm in wilmington this weekend and see what happens in an LTE area. 

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Re: So what should my mobile network type be for 4G?
Ann154
Expert
Expert
Let us know how that goes PJ. I would be interested to see if you can get eHPRD there and keep it when you go back to a 3G only area.

I'm most definitely NOT a VZW employee. If a post answered your question, please mark it as the answer.

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Re: So what should my mobile network type be for 4G?
PJNC284
Sr. Member

Decided to test it in a 3G only area first in case I borked something, I'd still have access to fast file downloads. lol A complete restore later and still no eHRPD.  Oh well, time to restore that "delayed" update. :smileywink:

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Re: So what should my mobile network type be for 4G?
VL600_Boston
Novice

It's too bad that "normal peope" should have to know all those technical acronyms.   As an engineer,  I am only comfy when I know exactly what they are.  But,  it should be optional  - for us tech-o-philes having to it is a sign of immature technology. 

So what are these things.   For the techies,  check out   http://www.cdg.org/    the cdma dev group. 

Also,   GSM and CDMA standards are converging -   http://www.gsmworld.com/technology/lte.htm

 

CDMA2000  and Long term evolution LTE   (some 4G capable Verizon smartphones do voice over the LTE network)

  • Verizon 3G (HRPD) - 800/1900Mhz   (note  High Rate Packet Data is a 3G thingy).  (see GSM equivalents)
  • Verizon 3.9G LTE (eHRPD) - 700Mhz    (note: evolved  High Rate Packet Data - a "4G" thingy)
  • Sprint 3G - CDMA 1900Mhz Only
  • Sprint 4G?  -  WiMAX 2.5Ghz

 

GSM  System: 

  • AT&T 3G - GSM 800/1900Mhz, HSDPA 800/1900 (select markets)
  • AT&T 4G LTE -   700Mhz frequency (when avail)
  • T-Mobile 3G - GSM/TDMA 800/1900Mhz "Voice", 1700/2100Mhz "Data"
  • T-Mobile 4G - HSPA+ 1700/2100Mhz

----------------

 

CDMA Evolution

 

 

 

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Re: So what should my mobile network type be for 4G?
Ann154
Expert
Expert
I thought AT&T used 850/1900 for their 3G or HSPA network?

I'm most definitely NOT a VZW employee. If a post answered your question, please mark it as the answer.

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Re: So what should my mobile network type be for 4G?
sandyinmiami
Member

Thanks for all the responses.  I still  have no signs of eHPRD.  I have been able to pick up  4G when  I drive through areas that have it.  I used to have it at home, but not since the outage. 

 

But I have to say  that when I run speed test, the results are dismal whether I'm in rev A  or 4G. 

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Re: So what should my mobile network type be for 4G?
VL600_Boston
Novice

Nice analog cell phoneHi Ann,  you have revealed yourself as a technophile.   You are outed. :smileyhappy:   Here's a pic of my first cell phone.

 

Technically,  you are correct.   Historically,   these original analog cell phone frequencies (AMPS) were called the "800 MHz band" and they ran from  824-894 MHz.    GSM,  initially a 2G digital technology from Europe, and now worldwide,   GSM-850 is a band that operates from 824-849 MHz  for uplink,  and 869-894 MHz for downlink.   So,  yoy see it covers almost a 100 MHz swath of spectrum.  The middle of  this range is about 850, so they changed the name of the band.  

 

More importantly,  in the USA,  GSM-1900 (1850 - 1990)  is the primary band used in urban areas with 850 as a backup -  850 was more commonly used in rural areas.   In other parts of the world,    GSM-900 (890 - 960) and GSM-1800 (1710-1890) are used. 

 

More recently,  new radio spectrum was auctioned for advanced service -  Verizon bought a lot of 700 MHz for their LTE network and T-mobile bought  spectrum at 1700 and 2100 MHz. ,  ATT owns spectrum in all these bands.   

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