Skip to main content
Accessibility Resource Center Skip to main content
Get up to $500 when you bring your phone. Plus, get the incredible iPhone 13 Pro on us. Online only. With select 5G Unlimited plans. Ends 12.5. Buy now
end of navigation menu
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
***Announcement: We’re excited to inform you that we will be merging the Fios and Wireless Communities to a unified Verizon Community with a new look and feel throughout. If you are interested in what specifically has changed, please see the New Revamped Community article under the Featured Topics.***
aircard performance
encore1
Member

I tried an ATT aircard for my laptop, and the reception was terrible.  My iphone would have 5 bars and the laptop with the air card would have 2 bars.  I took it back.  Folks have told me that they have better reception with the Verizon air cars (in the Gulf Coast- beach area).  I looked at the Verizon aircard, it is the same 3" X 1" usb device that ATT uses.  I'm worried that I will have the same poor performance from the Verizon aircard.  Anyone have experience using the aircard in the Gulf Coast onshore/offshore areas?

 

GT

 

0 Likes
Re: aircard performance
Jagger-VzW
Novice
You need to understand that the difference is not the equipment it is the network.  In fact, the device manuafacturer usually makes an Aircard that works for AT&T, Verizon Wireless, T-Mobile and Sprint.  Many times they are even called the same name or have the same nomenclature.   What is important is that you test the area that you'll be using (or potentially using) the Aircard in.  We offer a no-questions-asked 30-day return policy should the aircard not work for you, but I would suggest talking to some of your friends and seeing if anyone has an Aircard that you could borrow to see how it works where you need it to work - then you'll be positive it will work for you. 
0 Likes
Re: aircard performance
PDCLarry
Novice

As James said, it's the network, not the card. And also the location. A Verizon card is different internally from an AT&T card because they use different technologies (EvDO for Verizon, HSDPA for AT&T). But both are comparable under the best-case scenarios for the two carriers. I have both an AT&T aircard and a Verizon MiFi. In side-by-side tests the AT&T slightly outperforms the Verizon when both have a good signal - I can get 1.5 Mbps on the AT&T, and 1.4 Mbps on the Verizon. The BIG difference is that Verizon has more "best case scenarios" than AT&T does. Where EvDO and HSDPA are not available Verizon and AT&T both fall back to older technologies. In these cases AT&T performs better generally. But again, Verizon's EvDO coverage is better than AT&T's HSDPA, so you will fall back less often.

 

Now to location. What matters is not which is better on average, but which is better where you will be using it. You have a better chance with Verizon because the network is broader overall, but you should verify that it works where you need it to a level of performance you find acceptable. 

 

 

0 Likes
Re: aircard performance
LukeTech
Novice
Some USB based data cards have an port for an external antenna. With one of these antennas, you  could increase a marginal signal strength to a high signal strength. EVDO is very sensitive to signal strength and it will throttle your downlink (cell site to handset) speeds once your receive signal drops, every microwatt (literally) helps.

Also, there are cases where you might see different signal strength on EVDO vs. 1x. For example, in a market with 800MHz 1x and 1900Mhz EVDO (Greenville, SC for instance), the EVDO will not penetrate buildings quite as well as 1x. Higher RF frequency is physically able to move more bits but can't propagate as far or through as many obstacles. That is the idea behind using the 700MHz band for LTE in the future.
Message Edited by LukeTech on 06-04-2009 03:04 PM
0 Likes