Convert ethernet to coax
cc112
Enthusiast - Level 2

Hi all, I'm a newbie here and have a question - tried to search through existing threads but couldn't figure it out, please bear with me.

I'm upgrading from 100mbps internet only plan to 300mbps. Current set up is ONT > COAX > MI424WR (wireless turned off) > Orbi rbr50 mesh system.

My understanding from other thread is that Verizon will have anything above 100mbps go through COAX? They will replace it with ethernet? However I don't run ethernet cable all over the place. Trying to leverage the existing COAX cable and existing set up as much as possible. 

I was wondering if new set up can be ONT > ethernet cable > MOAC adapter > COAX > MI424WR (wireless turned off) > Orbi rbr50 mesh system?

I saw people mentioning following adapter but it seems the installation instruction starts with COAX in, and convert it to ethernet, not the reverse order that I wanted. Do you know if it can work the reverse ways? from Ethernet > COAX and then at other side of the house i can connect MI424WR and then Orbi?

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B013J7O3X0/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeAS...

OR should I use 2 MOAC adapter and do following, woutd this work better? ONT > ethernet cable > MOAC adapter > COAX > MOAC adapter > Orbi rbr50 mesh system

Thank you very much and happy holidays.

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Cang_Household
Community Leader
Community Leader

imageInternet via Coax

I just went digging a bit in a video made by another community leader and found this nice diagram. The above diagram likely depicts the setup you currently have, minus the TV service if you did not order such, and minus the phone service if you did not order either.

imageInternet via Ethernet

The above diagram shows if you were to order Internet with speeds higher than 100Mbps, you would need an Ethernet cable between the ONT and the router.

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Cang_Household
Community Leader
Community Leader

@cc11 wrote:

My understanding from other thread is that Verizon will have anything above 100mbps go through COAX? They will replace it with ethernet? However I don't run ethernet cable all over the place. Trying to leverage the existing COAX cable and existing set up as much as possible.


This is a little complicated. I think you are confusing two coax networks as one. The first coax network is between the ONT and your router, and this is the so called MoCA WAN. The second network is from your router to the rest of MoCA devices in your house, and this is the so called MoCA LAN.

The speed upgrade only concerns how your Internet is delivered from the ONT to your router, and right now, your Internet is delivered through MoCA WAN. Given the outdated chip in the ONT, you cannot order speeds higher than 100Mbps when your Internet is delivered through MoCA WAN. To resolve this issue, your should change your Internet delivery mechanism to Ethernet. To do this, simply route an Ethernet cable between the ONT and your router, and chat with a service presentative on Social Media platforms to change the provision on the ONT from MoCA WAN to Ethernet.

Notice, nothing in the speed upgrade procedure touches your MoCA LAN because that is a separate issue. Your MoCA LAN can continue to function regardless whether your Internet is delivered from the coaxial or Ethernet cables. Nonetheless, VZ have better MoCA LAN gears if you would like to buy or rent. The current MoCA LAN can support a throughput of 2500Mbps with MoCA 2.5, higher than the highest Fios speed offered by VZ (so far, and may about to change).

Cang_Household
Community Leader
Community Leader

imageInternet via Coax

I just went digging a bit in a video made by another community leader and found this nice diagram. The above diagram likely depicts the setup you currently have, minus the TV service if you did not order such, and minus the phone service if you did not order either.

imageInternet via Ethernet

The above diagram shows if you were to order Internet with speeds higher than 100Mbps, you would need an Ethernet cable between the ONT and the router.

cc112
Enthusiast - Level 2

Thank you very much. What you said makes a lot of sense and the diagrams were very helpful. There is no phone or TV, only Internet. I understand 300mbps Internet will be delivered via ethernet. Also understand the Ethernet coming out of ONT should be plugged into my router. My problem is ONT is far from the router in a different room. I dont want to run ethernet cable from ONT to router. I want to leverage the COAX cable that is already in the wall. There are COAX outlet at both ONT location and the router location.

Therefore I was thinking use maybe 2 MOAC adapters to link up as following: ONT > ethernet cable > MOCA adaptor > COAX cable in the wall> MOCA adaptor > router.

I'm assuming this part im asking is MOAC LAN that you mentioned right? Would this proposed set up work? I'm new to this and not sure if the adapter below can achieve what I wanted. 

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B013J7O3X0/ref=twister_B08XVL3GVS?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1

or https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08XWC4JGB/ref=twister_B09DFNP17D?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1

Thank you very much.

dexman
Community Leader
Community Leader

Focusing on the 424...

The 424 has been out of support for a while. I would suggest replacing it with a 3100.

cc112
Enthusiast - Level 2

thank you you are right! it is an old one I had for years. when i sign up for 300mbps, rep said it can support but even if it only get to 150mbps, i will be happy. Main goal is to get most of the existing equipment I have and definitely dont want to run ethernet cable through out the house. Thank you!

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dexman
Community Leader
Community Leader

To provide a little clarity, the 424 is no longer receiving security updates, thus the suggestion to replace it with a 3100. 🙂

cc112
Enthusiast - Level 2

Thank you. Will look into that one. Any insights into the other questions? Thank you.

dexman
Community Leader
Community Leader

I, myself, don't have any experience with the converters as my setup consists of a 3100 router and (3) 3200 extenders.

I recently upgraded my Internet from 400 to Gig. While I was running 400, one of the extenders was connected via coaxial cable.

That arrangement was able to deliver around 500 which is the same result as testing from Ethernet connected extenders (albeit with a slightly higher ping time).

Once I upgraded, the coaxial cable was replaced by Ethernet. 🙂

cc112
Enthusiast - Level 2

understood, thank you very much. Kudos to you.

Cang_Household
Community Leader
Community Leader

If that's the case, I would recommend a cheaper setup than two standalone MoCA Ethernet bridges. First, replace your MI424 with a used G1100 from Ebay for less than $40. Make sure you are purchasing a one with Verizon firmware and from a seller that has a good return policy.  Put the G1100 next to your ONT with its WiFi turned off and connected it to the ONT with Ethernet. Connect a coaxial cable from the G1100 at the ONT because G1100 has a built-in MoCA Ethernet bridge capped at 500Mbps. Second, buy a MoCA Ethernet bridge from goCoax. At this time, I only recommend the MA2500D model, which can be found here https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08XP8MMFG/ref=twister_B09DFNP17D?_encoding=UTF8&th=1 costing $74. Verizon also has an equivalent of this adapter with 3 more Ethernet ports costing $99 with free shipping. They both works and you can choose either depends on your needs. Place the MoCA adapter at where your mesh main node is located, with its one end connected to coax and the other end connected to the mesh node Ethernet.

Notice: due to the older chips in G1100, this setup would only deliver a throughput of 500Mbps, if you need gigabit or multigigabit throughput, a G3100 is highly recommended.

cc112
Enthusiast - Level 2

Thank you! That all make sense. It is a really tight space in that closet where ONT is at. I will see if I can get a legit G1100 and fit it in there.

Otherwise, would another MoCA adapter such as the one you recommend work, replacing the G1100 from the flow. I was thinking take out Verizon router completely, and just use Orbi mesh system as the router.

Any particular reason you recommended the MA2500D model instead of the 2 pack option?

Kudos to you and thank you again.

OR I just thought of another way and wondering if this would work. Only if there is benefit to keep a verizon router in the flow otherwise if 2 MoAC adapter works, then it saves more space: ONT > ethernet > MoAC adapter > COAX in the wall > COAX cable into verizion router (wifi off) > ethernet to Orbi mesh system.

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Cang_Household
Community Leader
Community Leader

A MoCA adapter can replace the G1100. But be aware that MoCA adapters are meant to be operated on the LAN side. If you were to put them on the WAN side, you need to disable their DHCP clients from pulling a WAN IP address.

Why I recommend MA2500D over ECB6200 is due to two reasons. First, the chipsets in ECB6200 are end of life. Second, they are field tested to be found not compatible with newer MoCA standards. If they were going to break, you need to replace both, they cannot mix and match with other brands.

cc112
Enthusiast - Level 2

Thank you! Do you mind elaborate what does following mean "If you were to put them on the WAN side, you need to disable their DHCP clients from pulling a WAN IP address." I thought they will be plug and go, didnt realized there is more to it. 

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Cang_Household
Community Leader
Community Leader

Sorry for the silence, I was caught with work. Some MoCA adapters come with a web interface that allows you to login and adjust some settings. To access its web interface, the adapter needs to have an IP address. Sometimes the adapter is preconfigured to self-assign an IP address that is well out of the normal private IPv4 address range and the publicly routable address range. If this is the case (the majority of MoCA adapters are the case), you are all set and can treat these MoCA adapters as plug and play devices. If the adapters are preconfigured to use DHCP to obtain an IP address from a DHCP server, then the adapter on the WAN side would inadvertently pull a publicly routable address from Verizon DHCP server. You want to avoid this scenario because VZ DHCP server would only assign one IP address per residential service account. Given the adapter occupies the single WAN IP address, your router cannot obtain another routable IP.

Although what I just said is rather complicated, the take home message is that the majority of MoCA adapters are plug and play but some configurations may be required in limited circumstances. In addition, you want to make sure the coax line from the ONT to your router is a dedicated coax line. If there are splitters on the way, they have to be MoCA compatible, that is to have a frequency passthrough of at least 1675 MHz. If the coax line is shared with other neighbors who are subscribing to cable services, that would be another concern as certain cable standards interfere with MoCA.