Does residential Fios fiber splits the traffic into VLANs for Internet, TV and VoIP?
manutech
Newbie

Does residential Fios fiber splits the traffic into VLANs for Internet, TV and VoIP?

let's say I want to put a GPON sfp+ module on my pfSense router and put the fiber there, skipping the ONT, 

how does the ONT divides the signal for all 3 components  (Internet, TV and VoIP)?

Thanks in advance

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Cang_Household
Community Leader
Community Leader

VLANs? No. A PON line carries downstream data (including VoIP), upstream data, and RF video on separate wavelengths. Watching TV won't occupy the bandwidth for Internet. The separation of wavelength is included in the advertisement during the initial rollout nearly 15 years ago.

GPON SFP+? No. GPON is not small factor pluggable. ONT is part of the Verizon network and is critical in provisioning (or limiting, if you will) the speeds to your subscribed speed.

How does the ONT divide different wavelengths? You may have learned spectrometer or diffraction grating in high school chemistry or physics class. It is the same principle in ONT.

The new NG-PON2 ONT does provide an XFP module. I think you can take that module and plug into your network device. Routers with native XFP slots are enterprise-grade and cost in the thousands. Verizon will have control over the XFP and to provision speed.

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Cang_Household
Community Leader
Community Leader

VLANs? No. A PON line carries downstream data (including VoIP), upstream data, and RF video on separate wavelengths. Watching TV won't occupy the bandwidth for Internet. The separation of wavelength is included in the advertisement during the initial rollout nearly 15 years ago.

GPON SFP+? No. GPON is not small factor pluggable. ONT is part of the Verizon network and is critical in provisioning (or limiting, if you will) the speeds to your subscribed speed.

How does the ONT divide different wavelengths? You may have learned spectrometer or diffraction grating in high school chemistry or physics class. It is the same principle in ONT.

The new NG-PON2 ONT does provide an XFP module. I think you can take that module and plug into your network device. Routers with native XFP slots are enterprise-grade and cost in the thousands. Verizon will have control over the XFP and to provision speed.

gs0b
Community Leader
Community Leader

Slight clarification:

GPON uses three wavelengths of light.  Two downstream and one upstream.  As noted, one of the downstream is for RF video (think TV channels.)  The other downstream and the upstream are for data.  All data including internet, VoIP, VOD and fios command/control goes over this link.  There are not separate wavelengths for voice and other non-user data flows.

I'm not sure of the exact mechanism used to separate the different data flows on the fiber.  The overall GPON link supports 2.4Gbps, which is also shared among different premises.  I suspect each service (user data, VoIP, command/control, VOD, ..) has it's own bandwidth allocation, but I'm not sure.  Some googling should reveal the answer if you want the details.  But know the ONT and OLT take care of all of this and users have no control over the process; other than subscribing to different service tiers, that is.

Cang_Household
Community Leader
Community Leader

Thanks for the correction. I will modify my original post.

dexman
Community Leader
Community Leader

FiOS service does require the installation of an ONT.

I don't know the precise workings of the Tellabs, Motorola and Alcatel-Lucent ONTs so I'll pass on that part.