Ethernet AND Coax WAN?
spthomas2
Enthusiast - Level 2

I'm helping my Daughter move her FIOS router to another room.  She has FIOS TV and Internet. She looked at the router (Actionte4ec M1424-WR Rev. D) and There are the usual Cat 6  cables connected to devices.  there is the Coax connected to the Coax port that goes into the wall and outside..  AND, there is a Cat. 6 Ethernet cable connected to the Ethernet WAN port that also goes into the wall!  Are both needed?  I've always thought it was one or the other, not both!  Not sure what the Ethernet WAN is doing, since the house is (as is normal) coax.

Steve

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smith6612
MVP MVP
MVP

@spthomas wrote:

Thanks for all the information.  And I guess we'll stay with the Ethernet.  The wiring I'm talking about is pulling ethernet cable from the FIOS box in the garage to the room we're moving the router too, since it doesn't have ethernet wiring now, but it does have coax.  One more question.  If I do stay with Ethernet, do I have to reconnect coax in the new location as well?  It currently is connected to both coax and to enthernet, though only Ethernet shows on the front panel light (and without the ethernet and onlyusing coax the router doesn't work).


If you use FiOS TV you will need to leave the Coax cable plugged in. That's how the Setupbox Boxes receive the data for guide, VOD, and so on. Otherwise, if you don't use Verizon's TV product, then the answer is up to you. If you use MoCa for Hardwired network access, then you'll need it. If not, just Ethernet. MoCa is pretty handy, FYI if you are looking to get a Wired connection where only Coaxial is.

Hope that helps 🙂

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weedeater1
Contributor - Level 3

The higher speed services use the Cat5e. What speed does she have?

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spthomas2
Enthusiast - Level 2

I don't know.  I suspect it's just whatever is the standard package bundled with TV.  I can't imagine she asked for anything other than what was offered.  

I guess I can trace the Cat cable back to the FIOS box.  I know there are FIOS tv coax outlets throughout the house but only the one Cat cable.  She had either FIOS or DSL (probably FIOS) internet first, then added TV later I know.

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armond_in_nj1
Master - Level 1

@spthomas wrote:

I'm helping my Daughter ... She has FIOS TV and Internet. She looked at the router (Actionte4ec M1424-WR Rev. D) and There are the usual Cat 6  cables connected to devices.  there is the Coax connected to the Coax port that goes into the wall and outside..  AND, there is a Cat. 6 Ethernet cable connected to the Ethernet WAN port that also goes into the wall!  ...   I've always thought it was one or the other ...


The lights on the router itself will indicate whether the WAN connection is Ethernet or coax.  Which one is lit?

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spthomas2
Enthusiast - Level 2

Turns out the Ethernet is the live one.  Both are connected, but not getting a light for the coax.  I seem to remember the coax that is wired into the house when built is pretty crappy, and they had some trouble geting FIOS to work.  So maybe that's why they used the Ethernet.

If the Ethernet is on and the light on the coax is not, does that mean the coax is not working at all?  I think I can pull Cat5/6 cable where the phone line used to be and just use it instead of the coax in the new room.  

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armond_in_nj1
Master - Level 1

@spthomas wrote:

Turns out the Ethernet is the live one ... not getting a light for the coax ... the coax that is wired into the house when built is pretty crappy ... If the Ethernet is on and the light on the coax is not, does that mean the coax is not working at all? ...


Last question first.  It means simply that your WAN source is Ethernet rather than coax.  If you can live with that, then all's well.  These days VZ typically installs FiOS using coax WAN.  It's cheaper and simpler for them, but of course many users opt for variations.

Depending on the subscription services in use, the coax feed to the router allows various Verizon devices and services that would otherwise be unavailable, such as VOD, the Guide, Caller ID, and so on.  The wiring is your choice, but in my view the best way to get online is wired, and that usually means having the devices (if not the router) run on Ethernet rather than wireless.  YMMV.
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spthomas2
Enthusiast - Level 2

Thanks for all the information.  And I guess we'll stay with the Ethernet.  The wiring I'm talking about is pulling ethernet cable from the FIOS box in the garage to the room we're moving the router too, since it doesn't have ethernet wiring now, but it does have coax.  One more question.  If I do stay with Ethernet, do I have to reconnect coax in the new location as well?  It currently is connected to both coax and to enthernet, though only Ethernet shows on the front panel light (and without the ethernet and onlyusing coax the router doesn't work).

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armond_in_nj1
Master - Level 1

@spthomas wrote:

... do I have to reconnect coax in the new location as well?  It currently is connected to both coax and to enthernet, though only Ethernet shows on the front panel light (and without the ethernet and onlyusing coax the router doesn't work).



The coax is related to other services as I indicated above.  If your daughter wants to keep these services, then re-connect.

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smith6612
MVP MVP
MVP

@spthomas wrote:

Thanks for all the information.  And I guess we'll stay with the Ethernet.  The wiring I'm talking about is pulling ethernet cable from the FIOS box in the garage to the room we're moving the router too, since it doesn't have ethernet wiring now, but it does have coax.  One more question.  If I do stay with Ethernet, do I have to reconnect coax in the new location as well?  It currently is connected to both coax and to enthernet, though only Ethernet shows on the front panel light (and without the ethernet and onlyusing coax the router doesn't work).


If you use FiOS TV you will need to leave the Coax cable plugged in. That's how the Setupbox Boxes receive the data for guide, VOD, and so on. Otherwise, if you don't use Verizon's TV product, then the answer is up to you. If you use MoCa for Hardwired network access, then you'll need it. If not, just Ethernet. MoCa is pretty handy, FYI if you are looking to get a Wired connection where only Coaxial is.

Hope that helps 🙂

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broey6
Enthusiast - Level 1

I was happy to find this post; i am going through the exact same exercise.  I have a Quantum Router upstairs and want to move it to my new office downstairs to use with a VOIP phone (rather have it wired).  The Quantum Router uses both Coax and Ethernet ; both go up to the attic and outside, then down to the basement near the electric service. I have 150/150 Service from FIOS.  I was told i could use a Moca Adaptor downstairs, but that only allows me 1 LAN port unless i add a second router?  So i would rather just move the Router and have the 4 LAN ports for multiple devices (dont really need wired upstairs; wireless is fine). 

So, can i just pull the Ehternet out of the attic and re route it to the new router location; and split the existing coax to my living room AV/TV? Send one coax to the Router and one to the AV/TV?

Thanks for any input.

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tns2
Community Leader
Community Leader

Yes. 

Note you still need the Ethernet Wan connection to go directly into your Verizon Router.  From your router you can attach 4 Ethernet devices or add Ethernet switches to one of the connection to add even more devices.  The MOCA COAX connection can be split pretty much anywhere in your home as long as the splitters go up past 2mhz and are two way.  Additional MOCA adapters can be added anywhere such COAX lines exist.  E.g. I have an extra Verizon router, that I have settings changed to be essentially just a switch that allows another 4 devices at another location in my house.

You must have the MOCA COAX and Etherenet connections made to your router if you have TV service (Verizon boxes) or other MOCA devices as all MOCA traffic to the intenet must go  via MOCA to the router and out your Ethernet connection to the ONT.

broey6
Enthusiast - Level 1

Thank you ; really helfpul.  Can i still get 150/150 if i just use a MOCA 2.0 Adaptor? Rather than pull the Ethernet ?

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CRobGauth
Community Leader
Community Leader

Don't believe so.

My understadning is that for 100M and above, Verizon will only provision via Ethernet.

tns2
Community Leader
Community Leader

None of the Ont's, as far as I have heard, support MOCA 2.0 speeds.  So strictly used IN house between routers and STB's.

LawrenceC
Moderator Emeritus

As this thread is now over two years old, it will be locked in order to keep discussions current. If you have the same or a similar question/issue we invite you to start a new thread on the topic.

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