No High Speed Internet AT ALL from ANY CARRIER
OSPF
Enthusiast - Level 3

In the area of Old Church in Hanover county I live in we do not have high speed internet from any carrier.    I telecommute and must use VPN to establish a secure connection to my company's network, so Satellite is not an option.  The Mobile Broadband signal is so weak I've had to purchase a amplifier and antenna to boost the signal to make it bearable.   There is a switch station just a mile down the road - why can't the equipment be put in there so we can get DSL? 

12 Replies
specials1
Enthusiast - Level 2

Without going into technicalities on why Verizon doesn't have a DSLAM available in your CO (which there could be a myriad of reasons for) I'd suggest that you check out the T-1 shopper website which will provide information on broadband internet options available in your area...

http://www.t1shopper.com/

And no, I'm not suggesting that you order a T-1...but simly to review what might be available...

Good luck.

jmw1950
Specialist - Level 2

Your other choice is to utilize a satellite based Internet  provider (Starband,Wildblue,Hughesnet etc). While these solutions tend to be more expensive than DSL or Mobil Phone Based, they are usually available just about everywhere with a decent exposure to the southern Sky.

Your last choice is probably to get ISDN service, which would get you a pair of 64kbps channels. Unlike DSL or FiOS or Mobile Phone Service, ISDN is a tariffed service  in most states. That means if you want to order it, generally the local telephone provider has to supply it. ISDN is likely to be as expensive or more expensive then Sat based, but it does come in over the telephone wires. You then need to find a ISP who supports ISDN connection on a pair of B channels. This tends to be an expensive solution, but generally if you landline telephone service, is available.

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OSPF
Enthusiast - Level 3

I can't use Satellite because I have to use VPN to connect remotely for my job. With Satellite my VPN connection would be slower than with dial-up.   I know this because some I work with initally went with a Sat. ISP and had big, big issues with his VPN connection.   

As for the ISDN it sounds interesting but I'd have to  do a bit more research as to price.  My company will let me expense only  up to a certain amount.    If it's more expensive than Sat. then it may not be a via option.  Thanks for the info.

OSPF
Enthusiast - Level 3

Thanks for the link.I'll check it out but the last time I casually looked into getting a T-1 it was over $1000.00 a month..  Don't think my employer will let me expense that Smiley Happy

specials1
Enthusiast - Level 2

Well, yeah, I believe that I had said that I don't expect you to get a T-1...Smiley Wink...although their prices have gone down tremendously over the past decade. In my neck of the woods, I could get it for under $500...which is still way more than I could afford - not that I need one anyway.

ISDN might be a viable option...but do some research and let us know what you've come up with.

Good luck.

OSPF
Enthusiast - Level 3

This is what I found out about ISDN.. It was the precursor to DSL and while it's faster than dial-up its not without its issues.  I copied this from Wikipedia.   Verizon does offer it, but as a medium business solution - sounds expensive.     Sounds like I'm stuck with limping along with what I have for a while. 

Advantages:

  1. Constant data rate at 64 kbit/s for each DS0 channel.
  2. Two way broadband symmetric data transmission, unlike ADSL.
  3. One of the data channels can be used for phone conversation without disturbing the data transmission through the other data channel. When a phone call is ended, the bearer channel can immediately dial and re-connect itself to the data call.
  4. Call setup is very quick.
  5. Low latency
  6. ISDN Voice clarity is unmatched by other phone services.
  7. Caller ID is almost always available for no additional fee.
  8. Maximum distance from the central office is much greater than it is for DSL.
  9. When using ISDN-BRI, there is the possibility of using the low-bandwidth 16 kbit/s "D" channel for packet data and for always on capabilities.

Disadvantages:

  1. ISDN offerings are dwindling in the marketplace due to the widespread use of faster and cheaper alternatives.
  2. ISDN routers, terminal adapters ("modems"), and telephones are more expensive than ordinary POTS equipment, like dial-up modems.
  3. ISDN provisioning can be complicated due to the great number of options available.
  4. ISDN users must dial in to a provider that offers ISDN Internet service, which means that the call could be disconnected.
  5. ISDN is billed as a phone line, to which is added the bill for Internet ISDN access.
  6. "Always on" data connections are not available in all locations.
  7. Some telephone companies charge unusual fees for ISDN, including call setup fees, per minute fees, and higher rates than normal for other services
jmw1950
Specialist - Level 2

In most locations ISDN is a tariffed service. That means if you order it, the local telco is pretty much required to provide it at the tariffed price. According to Verizon's web site, 'ISDN is available throughout the Verizon footprint'.

 It may be part of Verizon's medium business solutions, but there is absolutely nothing that prevents a residential customer from ordering it except perhaps the price. I haven't priced ISDN-BRI (Basic Rate Interface, (2 B+1D service) for several years, but the last time I looked it was about $80/month plus taxes and fees, so it isn't cheap, and the installation charges could be significant.

Having said that, it does tend to be expensive. Part of that is you actually get two phone lines (a pair of 64kbps Bearer or B channels). The other bad news is traffic is usually metered. Go over your monthly allowance, and you get billed. In addition your ISP needs to support ISDN, not all do, and may charge considerably more for an ISDN connection than for a dial up connection.

OSPF is correct in that POTS equipment is NOT compatible with ISDN, you will need to get new telephones, or some sort of adapter.

D channel usage is fairly limited, because it provides the control information for two 64kbps channels. For most users, it is not useful for data transmission.

IN any case, my advice is you call Verizon and ask. You don't have to order after they tell you what it would cost! A T1, alias ISDN-PRI service, may be less expensive!

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OSPF
Enthusiast - Level 3

I called Verizon Customer Service and after a bit I found someone who  knew what I was talking about when I asked for pricing on an ISDN-BRI line for a residential customer.   Guess what ?   About two years ago Verizon stopped offering ISDN/BRI-PRI lines to residential customers.    There is a remote CO a mile down the road from me so I then asked who did I have to talk to about why its not  DSL capable.  I  have no problems going door to door with a petition.    Just on my street  alone I could probably get close to 200 names and that's not even going outside of 1 mile.    Supposedly someone will be contacting me in the next 2 to 3 weeks so I guess I need to be patient for now.   

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smith6612
Community Leader
Community Leader

Good luck in getting DSL 🙂 .

I'm surprised Verizon hasn't upgraded the Remote a mile away from you. If that's the one you're coming out of, should it have rack space inside and the correct connections going to it DSL shouldn't take very long to install at all.

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OSPF
Enthusiast - Level 3

It's been a while since I checked this post, but I found and article on PRNEWSWIRE.COM about Verizon bringing DSL to '185,000 telelphone lines in nearly 90 switching facilities through out Virginia....'   My area; Old Church,  was listed  and the article was dated 10/14/2011 so I called thinking it would be avaliable.   Well as it goes no one in customer service has any idea about the article or when it will be avaliable to me.    Here's the link if anyone is interested. 

http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/verizon-online-expands-high-speed-internet-access-in-virgini...

  Now if someone could just tell me when it will be ready.  

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smith6612
Community Leader
Community Leader

Stupid question, but if Verizon refuses to even install a DSLAM in your nearby exchange or on a pole somewhere, is there by any chance your area is serviced by a Wireless ISP? I'm not taking about the Cell Phone carriers such as Verizon Wireless, Sprint or AT&T Mobility, but smaller companies who provide Internet wirelessly for in-home use. Some states such as Michigan have WIreless ISPs that service people, even if the speeds aren't the greatest at night or the latency, but is far better than dealing with Satellite, data-limited 3G/3.5G (LTE) plans, or forking out the cash to get T1s or ISDNs installed (if additional equipment must be brought in to make it work, since that is often on your dime). Yet again, if you do go the route of getting a T1 line or two installed, perhaps setting up a small neighborhood ISP and having your neighbors pay you for access to the T1s in their home might make things a bit more affordable. All that is needed for that in the big picture is of course, some money, and some networking knowledge.

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OSPF
Enthusiast - Level 3

I do have wireless mobile broadband, but the signal is very  weak so high speed it ain't.  For whatever reason the county (or someone) to date has not allowed towers in my area so what I'm getting is coming from over 7 miles away.   It's tolerable with a Wilson antenna and amplifier, and there's still a things we can't do, but at least I don't drop my VPN connection multiple times a day.  I have to use VPN because I work from home - otherwise I would have probably gone with a Satellite ISP.     I did check into the T-1 and the cheapest price is still about 400 bucks.   If it's split 3 ways its still 133 a month and I'm not sure I want to go that way. 

It would be great is they put the equipment in the switch, and maybe I can get some of the neighbors to together to start campaigning for it.