Router ok in ONT closet?
Veruser72
Enthusiast - Level 2

I want to switch my Fios service to internet only and use my own router. I would like to know if there will be too much heat if I put the router in the same little metal closet has that’s the ONT or the wiring closet that is next to it. The ONT box has an extra electrical outlet in it that I would use to plug in the router and switch. Advisable?

note: I think I need a router and switch in these closets because the house is wired for Ethernet and my understanding is that I need a router and switch between the ONT and the patch board. I will deactivate wifi on this router (testing with the VZ Actiontec then probably replacing with the VZ1100) and plug a new Archer AX50 into one of the activated wall outlets. 

thanks for your advice and sharing your experience

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gs0b
Community Leader
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How many Ethernet ports do you need to activate?  If it's four or less, you don't need a switch as the AX50 has four ports.

As for heat, that's impossible for anyone here to answer.  It depends on max expected ambient temperature, the size of the box, how much exterior air can get in/out, and how exterior airflow the exposed metal has.  For example, a large box with good exterior airflow and some openings to let air in/out can work well, while a small box one could get too warm.  Get a thermometer with a remote sensor and monitor the temperature over time.  You can get one with a wired remote sensor for not much money from your favorite online store.

Check the specs on your router, it's probably rated for operation up to 50C or maybe even 80C.  That will tell you what to watch for.

Are you planning on using WiFi from the router?  If so, I wouldn't put it inside a metal box.  It will significantly reduce if not block WiFi signals.  That's probably a bigger issue than temperature.

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Veruser72
Enthusiast - Level 2

Someone helped me yesterday with a Q, hoping this interests someone as well.

After many chats with Fios staff I was able to upgrade my service to 300/300 and go from coax to Ethernet without any tech visit/fee. I purchased a Fios quantum gateway from Mr Bezos to make this happen. I will be installing the AX3000 to get wifi etc.  

The ONT and house wiring patch board are in a closet that will not accommodate a wifi router. So I have the Gateway there right now with the Ethernet from the ONT into the WAN port and patch cables in three of the LAN ports powering three Ethernet wall outlets in the house. Joy, My computer is now hard-wired without a 100 foot cable running through the rooms. Once I install the AX3000 in the center of the house, I will still need something routing/bridging the ONT to the three home outlets. Ethernet from one of those outlets will be plugged into the AX3000 WAN (right?) I will have to do some configuring to dumb down the gateway to avoid conflicts. 

so, the real question, I know the Quantum Gateway is legacy equipment and probably prone to problems. Given how hard it is to access these wiring cabinets, is there an alternative to the gateway, like a non wifi router or something? Quick search turned up a TPLink ER605 VPN router. Will this do the job? Or something else?

thank you again for reading all of this and thinking about it

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gs0b
Community Leader
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The G1100 is a solid device.  It is still receiving firmware updates, but not for new features.

As an internet only customer, you can use any router you want.  You can plug the AX3000 directly into the ONT.

If you have a place with two Ethernet cables run from the closet, put the router there.  Use one Ethernet for the WAN connection.  Use the other to connect to a LAN port on the router.  Put a switch in the closet and connect it to the LAN run from the router.  Use other ports on the switch to provide Ethernet to the other runs in the home.

If you don't have a place with two Ethernets, see if you can find a place where you can run a 2nd Ethernet.  Or, do what  you suggested and find a small router that fits in the closet and run the AX3000 in AP mode.

Veruser72
Enthusiast - Level 2

Thank you, I like your second suggestion, but there are only three wired outlets, all in different rooms, I guess I’m just grateful that there are any outlets, even though I’d prefer two more…

thanks for the info on the 1100, too. I did get eight years out of the ActionTec. I was worried about the 1100 because Verizon told me it was “legacy equipment “ and I should expect to replace my routers ever 2 - 2-1/2 years. News to me since they never offered to replace one;)

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gs0b
Community Leader
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Verizon may end support for the G1100 soon, as they are likely about to ramp up availability of the newest router, the CR1000A.  When that happens, I wouldn't be surprised if they end-of-life the G1100.  Once they do that, it will no longer receive security updates and should be removed from primary service.  It will still have use as a MoCA bridge or access point, but I wouldn't run it as a primary router.

Otherwise, it's a decent box.  I still run one in my home after many years.  I've augmented it's WiFi with a mesh network, but it's worked fine for me even with gigabit service.  When they end support, I'll most likely replace it with a non-Verizon router as I don't have their TV service.

Capricorn1
Community Leader
Community Leader

I think gs0b has the right answer, but if I were putting a bet on it, I would bet it would work pretty well with both in the closet. The ONT doesn't generate a lot of heat. The Archer AX50 router probably doesn't generate a lot either. So long as both have decent airflow around them, having them in the closet should be fine. Getting a thermometer with an outdoor remote sensor is a good idea. It doesn't hurt to try it out. If it is getting too hot in the closet then moving the router out of the closet is a matter of running a long(er) Ethernet cable from the ONT to the router placed somewhere outside of the closet. In my house, most of my ONT is outside, but the power supply and Ethernet connection are in a closet. My router is outside of the closet about 10 feet away. (It's not a Verizon router either.)

As Cang_Household mentioned, if you get a second router to get better WiFi coverage, you should manually disable the second router's routing functions (especially DHCP, since you only want one router handing out IP addresses). If the second router is another Archer AX50, you can put that into AP mode (access point mode). TP-Link's manual for the Archer AX50 has a section on how to do that and doing so shuts off all the routing functions (like DHCP). What that doesn't mention is if you can still use the WAN port. On some router's, setting AP mode disables the WAN port, so you would just use one of the LAN ports instead. (I have a Netgear Orbi mesh router in AP mode, which turns the WAN port into just another LAN port.) You can usually leave the wireless running on both routers as well. Just set them to use the same SSID and password for the wireless network. I also recommend setting the second router to using a static IP address either by assigning it using an IP address reservation by MAC address in the first router (using the second router's MAC address), or just give it an fixed IP address outside of the range that the first router serves. (You may have to adjust the IP address range in the first router to save a small set of IP addresses from being offered by the DHCP service.)

One thing I will add is that you may want to consider adding a small UPS inside the closet with the router and ONT and plugging both of those into that. Doing so will keep the network up during short outages. I have my router, wireless access point, and most of my switches on UPSs. When the power goes out, I don't lose the network, which gives me time to save anything I was doing. When working from home and using a VPN connection (two in my case), this can save a lot of time by not having to reconnect every time the power blips for a second or two. That and not losing what I was working on at that moment, so if the outage becomes extended, I have time to shut everything down in a normal fashion.

gs0b
Community Leader
Community Leader

How many Ethernet ports do you need to activate?  If it's four or less, you don't need a switch as the AX50 has four ports.

As for heat, that's impossible for anyone here to answer.  It depends on max expected ambient temperature, the size of the box, how much exterior air can get in/out, and how exterior airflow the exposed metal has.  For example, a large box with good exterior airflow and some openings to let air in/out can work well, while a small box one could get too warm.  Get a thermometer with a remote sensor and monitor the temperature over time.  You can get one with a wired remote sensor for not much money from your favorite online store.

Check the specs on your router, it's probably rated for operation up to 50C or maybe even 80C.  That will tell you what to watch for.

Are you planning on using WiFi from the router?  If so, I wouldn't put it inside a metal box.  It will significantly reduce if not block WiFi signals.  That's probably a bigger issue than temperature.

Veruser72
Enthusiast - Level 2

Awesome point about the switch, I only have three wired ports in the house so I can just plug to router- thank you! 

I will use one of those wired ports to plug in a new TP Link router, so the wifi will not be coming from the closet. Next challenge is how to figure out network settings with the two routers…

thank you for your response and help

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Cang_Household
Community Leader
Community Leader

@Veruser72 wrote:

Next challenge is how to figure out network settings with the two routers…


Easy. Primary router remain unchanged.

Secondary router needs to be reduced into an access point/switch combo by 1) disabling its DHCP server; 2) assigning a static LAN IP address within the same subnet as the primary router but not conflicting; 3) connecting an Ethernet cable between the LAN of the primary router to the LAN of the secondary router.

Done.