Unable (?) to Use a UPS With My ONT
CellDaddy
Contributor - Level 1

This is actually a follow-up to an earlier post by me: Protecting an ONT with a UPS - Good Idea?

In that post I explained that I wanted to protect my ONT with a UPS. I described my situation as follows:

I have internet-only service with Verizon. My ONT (which is in my basement) is attached to a battery backup from Verizon, which in turn is plugged into the wall socket. Verizon's battery backup isn't needed for internet-only service; it was probably installed so that if I ever wanted to add Voice service, Verizon wouldn't have to send a technician to my home.

I was correctly advised to remove Verizon's battery backup, so that my ONT will plug directly into my UPS, and the UPS will plug into the wall.

But there's a problem.

The power cable that connects my ONT to Verizon's battery backup does not terminate in a three-prong plug. Rather, it looks more like a co-axial cable. In fact, there is no three-prong outlet in the ONT. So if I were to remove Verizon's battery backup, I don't see how I could plug the ONT into the UPS. (There's no co-axial connector on the UPS.)

It seems like I'm stuck with Verizon's battery backup - I'm going to have to plug that into my UPS, and my UPS into the wall socket. So I have three questions:

1- Is there a better solution? (Perhaps to replace the power cable coming out of the ONT with the same type only with a three-prong plug at one end, if such a thing even exists.)

2- If I have to add the UPS after Verizon's battery backup, will that arrangement work properly?

3- Is such an arrangement safe? I don't know if there are actual batteries in Verizon's battery backup. I presume 'yes' but I would have to take it apart to find out. I guess I'm afraid of the batteries overheating or bursting.

Thanks again for your help.

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CellDaddy
Contributor - Level 1

And the answer - according to Verizon - is:

The box that I called a battery backup is actually not a battery backup at all. Rather, it is the power supply for the ONT. And it's perfectly safe to plug the power supply into a UPS. Problem solved.

By calling that box a battery backup, I confused the people who have been trying to help me. I'm very sorry for that, and I appreciate your efforts to help.

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dexman
Community Leader
Community Leader

The Verizon backup unit goes completely away. It will no longer be needed.

Unplug the mini cable from the side of the ONT's power supply and coil it up out of the way.

Plug the UPS into an electrical outlet, then, plug the ONT's power supply's 3 prong plug into one of the UPS's sockets that is backed-up by the internal battery.

So this is the "chain":

Electrical outlet-> UPS-> ONT's power supply (the "brick") -> ONT.

CellDaddy
Contributor - Level 1

I think you missed this part of my message: the power cable coming out of the ONT does not terminate in a three-prong plug.

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dexman
Community Leader
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I checked the plug on the power supply for my 211 ONT and it is, indeed, a two prong.

It can still be plugged into a socket on the UPS. I'm going under the assumption that the UPS has 15 Amp sockets that look like outlets in a wall receptacle.

dexman
Community Leader
Community Leader

Could pictures of the ONT, the power supply and the battery unit be posted? I checked the original topic and didn't see any pictures.

CellDaddy
Contributor - Level 1

It's late where I am. I'll post again tomorrow.

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CellDaddy
Contributor - Level 1

Every picture tells a story, so here they are. Attention Verizon: I have taken pains to blot out any serial numbers.

image

Here's more:

image

Here's a closeup of the connector for the power cable coming out of the ONT:

image

And finally, here's a closeup of the connector for the power cable exiting from the battery backup:

image

Thanks again, for your help.

dexman
Community Leader
Community Leader

I'll check the pictures once they are approved by a Moderator. 🙂

dexman
Community Leader
Community Leader

Looking at the first picture, the round shaped plug goes to the ONT's power supply. The power supply is marked "battery backup". The battery backup has a swinging door with enough slots to insert 12 D batteries.

The Power Reserve unit would only benefit a Fios subscriber with telephone service.

Unplug that from the receptacle, plug in the UPS to the now available socket and then plug the round plug into a fully supported socket on the UPS. 🙂

I posted a picture of my setup, but a barcode snuck into the background, so I submitted a revised picture showing how it looks for my equipment. 🙂

CellDaddy
Contributor - Level 1

I'll try calling Verizon and let you know what they tell me.

dexman
Community Leader
Community Leader

That was an oversight on my part. 😞

Either way, the device marked battery backup is actually the ONT's power supply. Plug that into the UPS and you'll be all set. 🙂

dexman
Community Leader
Community Leader

Here is the Power Reserve's product page:

https://www.verizon.com/home/accessories/powerreserve/

CellDaddy
Contributor - Level 1

With all due respect to you ...

the PowerReserve in your link uses 12 D batteries. The battery backup I have isn't big enough to hold that many batteries or deep enough to fit a D battery. Also, my battery backup (if that's what it really is - I was just presuming) has no hinges to provide easy access to the batteries. I would have to take mine off the wall and open it with a screwdriver, if possible.

What I've got - whatever it is - has a reset button and a small, round receptacle for what looks like a 9 volt connector. (Maybe there are 9V batteries inside?) Nothing else on the device.

Once I solve the mystery (to me) of what that is, I'll report back.

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CellDaddy
Contributor - Level 1

And the answer - according to Verizon - is:

The box that I called a battery backup is actually not a battery backup at all. Rather, it is the power supply for the ONT. And it's perfectly safe to plug the power supply into a UPS. Problem solved.

By calling that box a battery backup, I confused the people who have been trying to help me. I'm very sorry for that, and I appreciate your efforts to help.

dexman
Community Leader
Community Leader

Simple "plug & play" solution. 🙂

Completely optional:

Once a month, I briefly I unplug each of my UPSs from the electrical outlets to make sure that they will function properly in the event of a real power failure.

dexman
Community Leader
Community Leader

This is the ONT's power supply plug connected to a socket on the back of my UPS.

image

LawrenceC
Moderator Emeritus

I would like to thank everyone for taking the time to post your comments and opinions related to this topic. This topic has been thoroughly discussed and will now be closed. Please feel free to open a new thread for further discussion. Thank you.

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