Coaxial cables topology: longer cable vs. more consecutive splitter
M_Z1
Newbie

Hi All,

A technical question regarding connecting the second TV.

Currently I have a 2-way splitter (just near the ONT) and 2 relatively long pieces of coax cable going from the splitter to two remote rooms where we have a router and the main TV. And we need to connect another TV in the 3d room, which is relatively close to the room where we currently have a router.

Here is what we can do:

A.    Replace a 2-way splitter with the 3-way one and add a long (50-feet) piece of cable from the splitter to the new TV outlet.

B.    As the new TV is in the room that is next to a room with the router:

        -- Pull the cable - that is currently goes to the router - out of the outlet (from inside the outlet)

        -- Connect an additional 2-way splitter to the cable

        -- put a short (6-feet) piece of cable to connect the new splitter back to the router outlet

        -- put a medium (25-feet) piece of cable to connect the new splitter to the new TV outlet

Mathematically / theoretically (in terms of signal loss) either one unbalanced 3-way splitter or 2 consecutive 2 way splitter should be the same.

(A) looks a bit neater, but it means there is another long cable that goes through the entire house from the garage (ONT) to a remote room.

With the (B) we do a kind of piggyback ride on the existing cable, but there will be a lot of pieces / connections between the ONT and the new TV

Are there any ideas what would be better (A - another long cable) or (B - reusing the existing cables but adding a splitter and more pieces of cable)?

Thank you in advance.

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14 Replies
bosceltics
Enthusiast - Level 2

Our house has a 4 tv set up and was built in the 60s so  there was( is) no easy way  to install  cable other than through walls .The bedrooms are split at each tv and then sent on to the next room. The kitchen tv required an additional long cable run and verizon suggested and installed a 110 volt signal amplifier .The the famiy room  is split from the main cable and then split again for the router .and tv .When I we made the switch to verizon the installer tested and retested every cable,connector and splitter .After 6 hours every single spltter ,cable and connector was  replaced only to find out that the instaler's test equipment was faulty .So in short if the route you chose gives you trouble an amplifier will cure the signal loss.

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CRobGauth
Community Leader
Community Leader

You havew to be careful with amplifiers.

STBs require two way communications.

Most amplifiers are only 1 way.

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M_Z1
Newbie

Thank you for your advices.

Back to the coaxial cable: do you think the one referenced a couple of posts above (by Megabridge) is reasonable? Should one bother to spend time and find something of higher quality? Does it matter for home use with Verizon Quantum TV?

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CRobGauth
Community Leader
Community Leader

RG-6 is pretty much the same.

You might even find it at you local big box store.

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TomH121
Community Leader
Community Leader
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CRobGauth
Community Leader
Community Leader

If all of your cabling is rg6 it probably doesn't matter.

Home runs are usually preferable..

Put the shortest run on the leg of the 3way splitter that has the most loss.

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M_Z1
Newbie

Thank you all.

One more question (tried a quick search and did not find an answer easily): does this cable by Mediabridge look reasonable to experts / community? Tried to find some kind of hi-end, but it looks like it does not really matter in terms of TV picture quality. Are there any other (better) brands?

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TomH121
Community Leader
Community Leader

From the point of view of future troubleshooting solution A.

It involves fewer coax  connections...less potential for possible  noise problems 

How and where are your PC's "hooked" up ?

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M_Z1
Newbie

Thank you for your response.

Our only wired PC is connected to the router, which - in turn - is connected (through a short coax cable) to the outlet. This is, basically, the outlet I described in (B). If we went with (B) we'd put an additional splitter at the end of the cable that currently goes to this outlet. The rest of our devices (laptops / smartphones / tablets) use wi-fi.

Thanks again.

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TomH121
Community Leader
Community Leader
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M_Z1
Newbie

Thank you for sharing your layout. It is really helpful.

It, actually, looks more like (B) in our case: there are consecutive 2-way splitters, rather than one 3 or 4-way splitter. But your suggestion to go the route (A) sounds reasonable. I'm tempting to follow it. The only concern is a relatively long cable that would go from the splitter in the garage to the room with a new TV: I'll need a 50-feet piece of cable. Not sure whether or not it is going to affect picture quality.

I was thinking to go with this one

Thank you.

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TomH121
Community Leader
Community Leader

This should help re loss per foot of cable

http://www.w4rp.com/ref/coax.html

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M_Z1
Newbie

Looks like a significant loss... : - (

Not sure what would be a frequency on my case. Verizon splitter says 1675Mhz (1.675 Ghz?). This frequency is not in the table, but even with 1Ghz for RG-6 there would be 6.1Db per 100ft. If we do linear math here (even though it might be not precisely accurate), it would be (6.1*1.675)*(50/100) ~= 5.1Db

Thank you once again.

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TomH121
Community Leader
Community Leader

RG 6 @ 1 Gz

100 ft 6.1 db loss

50 ft 3.05 db loss

Don't see that as a problem.

 Chart on Right hand side very interesting

 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decibel

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