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What exactly is a jetpack for?
PEGDEN47
Member

We recently bought a jetpack so we could get on the internet from our motorhome. But I'm having a little trouble figuring out why verizon treats it as a hotspot and only gives us 15 gig before we are slowed down so much, the internet is almost unusable? I was under the impression the jetpack would help us get connected to the internet via our computer. If it's not to connect a computer to the internet, what is it used for? We signed up for the "unlimited" plan which has proven to be the opposite of unlimited. So can anyone explain what their thinking is since I've been unable to get an answer from any verizon person, and I've tried many! 

We also have an AT & T account, which in my opinion, is far superior to verizon. We have 2 iPhones, 3 iPads and a mifi, ALL of which get 22 gig per month of data. They are not slowed down when any of them hit 10 or 15 gig, they get 22 gig of truly unlimited data. After that, I guess we would be slowed down if we were in a congested area but we haven't noticed any speed change since having the plan for many months. Our mifi also has 22 gig of data available to it, which we use to get on the internet via our computers, and have used up to 80 gig on it in one month with no notice of a slowdown at any time.

So maybe I shouldn't be comparing the two services but I just find it odd that, the same type of device between the two companies, would be treated so differently, unless I'm missing something. Each of our devices through AT & T has a phone number assigned to it, as does our jetpack and flip phone through verizon so it seems like EACH line should have the 22 gig of unlimited data available to it.

Maybe I'm missing something; if anyone has ANY insights, I would sure love to hear them!

Annette

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Re: What exactly is a jetpack for?
dexman
Sr. Member

The Jetpack is used to allow non 4G/LTE devices access to the Internet on a short term basis. It is assigned to your VZW account and draws data from your available limit.

So, in that regard, yes, it is a Hotspot and is subject to limits imposed by various plans.

For more permanent situations...using VZW's services as a substitute for landline services....Verizon Wireless has a different device. It, too, is treated as a Hotspot and is subject to limits imposed by various plans.

Re: What exactly is a jetpack for?
John_Getzke
Leader
Leader

> But I'm having a little trouble figuring out why verizon treats it as a hotspot and only gives us 15 gig before we are slowed down so much, the internet is almost unusable?

That's the Verizon Unlimited plan you signed up for.  Hit the limit and your connection will be optimized down to 3G speeds.

> If it's not to connect a computer to the internet, what is it used for?

The Jetpack is connecting your computers to the internet, its the speed you have concerns with so far.

> So can anyone explain what their thinking is since I've been unable to get an answer from any verizon person, and I've tried many!

They were thinking that they could offer Unlimited (no overage fee) plans again if they started to curb off resources for the folks who go above and beyond typical usage scenarios.  The Verizon Data Optimization cap has risen several times since 4G LTE unlimited was initially offered, removed and then reintroduced into the market.  Verizon used to optimize 3G connections that would hit a few GB in a given billing cycle as it was viewed as excessive use to consume a even that much data at the time.

> So maybe I shouldn't be comparing the two services but I just find it odd that, the same type of device between the two companies, would be treated so differently, unless I'm missing something.

Sounds like the two companies have different strategies for delivering an unlimited data plan.

> Each of our devices through AT & T has a phone number assigned to it, as does our jetpack and flip phone through Verizon so it seems like EACH line should have the 22 gig of unlimited data available to it.

It all depends on your data plan.  If you pool the devices together the cap may be different than if you were to open individual accounts for each line.  There are pros and cons with each strategy for managing multiple devices so you will have to review the options and choose the one that works best for your scenario.

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Re: What exactly is a jetpack for?
Thegame2007
Member

I gave the same question 

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Re: What exactly is a jetpack for?
Condoc
Member

The jetpack can be used for phones, desktops, laptops, in the house or while driving on a trip. The kids with poor internet connections would use the jetpack while riding in the car because Verizon does have good coverage.

Where is really suffers, especially with Verizon, is that once you use 15 gigs, 30 gigs during the COVID19  crisis, they will slow you down, up to 600kps.  They have slowed us down to 180kps download, and 560 kps upload, 10 pm speed test.  You effectively can't connect many times because servers will time out before Verizon lets you connect.  Maybe if enough people complained they would not cut the speed down as much.

We have wireless service available locally or even satellite and they said that they'd only slow you down between 1-3 mgs.  My DSL (Frontier)  was only 1.2mbps, on a good day, so satellite and wireless are options if you really need the speed.

Re: What exactly is a jetpack for?
vzw_customer_support
Customer Support

KerryC_VZW Hello, we can provide guidance through here. Please feel free to send us a Private Note.

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Re: What exactly is a jetpack for?
Green_Sub
Member

Here is another angle to reduce the amount of data you use.

Our landline DSL is slow by todays standards, 6 mb down / 0.5 up.

I really like using Safari on my iPad, sometimes over my Verizon Do More Unlimited Plan Hot Spot feature.

Google “A free ads blocker DNS“ or similar. Cuts down on the amount of data I use and speeds up web surfing.

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