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RETURNING A PHONE TO ITS OWNER
miles_wheat
Newbie

I just confiscated an Iphone from one of my students (I'm an assistant principal).  The phone has been reset and has none of its original information in it.  I do have the model and serial number.  Is there a way I can use those numbers to locate the original owner?

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Re: RETURNING A PHONE TO ITS OWNER
rcschnoor
Legend

This is YOUR responsibility. If you are going to confiscate phones at your school, you should at least have the decency to keep track of the owner of the device. SHAME on you.

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Re: RETURNING A PHONE TO ITS OWNER
jUStPunkin
Enthusiast

Sounds more like the phone was reset when he took it; not that he reset it. My guess is it was stolen by one student (probably the one he confiscated it from).

Re: RETURNING A PHONE TO ITS OWNER
rcschnoor
Legend

If that is the case, my apologies.

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Re: RETURNING A PHONE TO ITS OWNER
Snn5
Legend

If the SIM is still in it, pull it out, call or visit Verizon (corporate store.)  Tell them the SIM number and situation and perhaps there is another method of contact on file at Verizon that they can use to contact the owner.  There are other methods, but those might cause confusion and hassle.

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Re: RETURNING A PHONE TO ITS OWNER
MiiHere
Champion

The parent of that child will more than likely will be upset that it wasn't given back and be demanding it back soon.

Assuming there aren't any underlying circumstances; the kid stole it, parents don't know it's gone yet or perhaps that they even had a phone etc.

I've never been at a school where the teachers and office staff couldn't work together to figure out who a student was. Or a school that didn't have an intercom system that you could call forth the student whom you took it from. While they couldn't prove it was their phone if it was reset with no personal data, as an assistant principle you should recognize the kid.