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Re: Again something that I don't understand to the fullest. (Port Fowarding)
Hubrisnxs
Legend
Btw I think its the ip your putting in. That should be the internal ip of the machine you are on. So that might look like 192.168.1.x
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Re: Again something that I don't understand to the fullest. (Port Forwarding)
cbwoodstock91
Contributor

Hi,

         I would like to share the following information, you may find interesting.

Port forwarding, also known as tunneling, is basically forwarding a network port from one node to the other. This forwarding technique allows an outside user to access a certain port (in a LAN) through a NAT (network address translation) enabled in router

Advantages of Port Forwarding

Port forwarding basically allows an outside computer to connect to a computer in a private local area network. Some commonly done port forwarding includes forwarding port 21 for FTP access, and forwarding port 80 for web servers. To achieve such results, operating systems like the Mac OS X and the BSD (Berkeley Software Distribution) will use the pre-installed in the kernel, ipfirewall (ipfw), to conduct port forwarding. Linux on the other hand would add iptables to do port forwarding.

Downsides of Port Forwarding

There are a few downsides or precautions to take with port forwarding.

    * Only one port can be used at a time by one machine.
    * Port forwarding also allows any machine in the world to connect to the forwarded port at will, and thus making the network slightly insecure.
    * The port forwarding technology itself is built in a way so that the destination machine will see the incoming packets as coming from the router rather than the original machine sending out the packets.

Common Applications of Port Forwarding

Port forwarding is widely used, especially in offices, schools, and homes with many computers connected to the Internet. This is basically when computers are doing port forwarding within itself. If a computer is using a shared IP address it must do port forwarding within itself. If the internet connection is being shared among many computers, all these computers must do port forwarding in its own system. Also, if a router has NAT enabled, the computers connected to it must also do port forwarding within itself.

Have a good Day!

Re: Again something that I don't understand to the fullest. (Port Forwarding)
ryan3141
Enthusiast

Thanks a lot guys. I think I got it working. I did have to use the internal IP instead of the external one. I don't know why though because every one else uses the external when I watch online. If it doesn't work somehow I'll tell you guys since you're the brains. Thanks again.

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Re: Again something that I don't understand to the fullest. (Port Forwarding)
viafax999
Super User
Super User

@ryan3141 wrote:

Thanks a lot guys. I think I got it working. I did have to use the internal IP instead of the external one. I don't know why though because every one else uses the external when I watch online. If it doesn't work somehow I'll tell you guys since you're the brains. Thanks again.


Then obviously every else using an external address didn't work.

The term port forwarding means exactly what it says. Forward a port to the destination.  As you're trying to access from the outside the destination must be the inside.

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