POTS Landline services
Chicopee01013
Enthusiast - Level 1

Why is it that Verizon made millions off people when only landlines were available, and now that cell phones are the newest (read most profitable) thing they want to cut out landline service?  For those of us who want basic "plain old telephone service" (POTS) without wireless which craps out way too often, we aren't allowed a choice.  It also makes no sense since companies still have POTS because of reliability issues but poor old John Q. Public has no such option.  Profits rule the day.  All federal buildings, schools, utility companies, hospitals and law enforcement buildings have POTS for those very reasons but the plain old public isn't given that right.  Tell me it has nothing to do with money.  I realize everyone wants to make a profit, but not at the expense of the very individuals who built up the phone business in the first place!  Personally, if I had MY way, I'd ONLY have a landline.  I don't feel the need to be at everyone's beck and call 24/7, 365 days a year.  I value my time, even if huge corporations don't.  Please, give us back our landline option and prove that people matter, not just businesses.

1 Solution
dexman
Community Leader
Community Leader

With the ever-increasing acceptance of mobile and fiber/IP-based services for delivery of voice, video & data, OSP copper utilization continues to decline.  Even if Verizon, AT&T, Frontier, Consolidated and other providers maintained the OSP copper facilities to perfection, that wouldn't stop the continuing attrition to cable & alternate services & providers.

On top of that, Verizon and other service providers are in the process of shutting down their legacy digital Central Office voice switches. The Western Electric 5E switch is now being supported by Nokia. The Nortel DMS-100, 250 & 500 are supported by another company.

All of these switches are manufacturer discontinued and, undoubtedly, costing more & more to support each & every year. The cost to maintain outside copper cabling also becomes more & more expensive.

Verizon isn't completely stopping landline services. The company is migrating (Fios) users to regional packet switches) which act similarly to old POTS lines with the exception that the Fios ONT needs to be supported by a UPS to keep services up & running during power failures. In the event of long duration power failures, users can use a mobile phone as a backup until power is restored.

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1 Reply
dexman
Community Leader
Community Leader

With the ever-increasing acceptance of mobile and fiber/IP-based services for delivery of voice, video & data, OSP copper utilization continues to decline.  Even if Verizon, AT&T, Frontier, Consolidated and other providers maintained the OSP copper facilities to perfection, that wouldn't stop the continuing attrition to cable & alternate services & providers.

On top of that, Verizon and other service providers are in the process of shutting down their legacy digital Central Office voice switches. The Western Electric 5E switch is now being supported by Nokia. The Nortel DMS-100, 250 & 500 are supported by another company.

All of these switches are manufacturer discontinued and, undoubtedly, costing more & more to support each & every year. The cost to maintain outside copper cabling also becomes more & more expensive.

Verizon isn't completely stopping landline services. The company is migrating (Fios) users to regional packet switches) which act similarly to old POTS lines with the exception that the Fios ONT needs to be supported by a UPS to keep services up & running during power failures. In the event of long duration power failures, users can use a mobile phone as a backup until power is restored.