Ethernet Port Activation
MaslowLover96
Newbie

Hi,

Just moved into a new apartment and only one port is currently active. Verizon technician said that, in order to activate whatever ports I need, the router needs to be plugged directly into the ONT. I am assuming this means that I need to take the white Ethernet cable from the ONT box and put it into the WAN port on the back of the router instead of Port 8 up top. After that, I believe I need to run Ethernet cords from the LAN ports on the back of the router to the ports on top that correspond to the correct "outlets" throughout the apartment, which I will probably need to do by trial and error since they are combination voice and data ports. Can someone please tell me if I am correct in all of my assumptions?  I just need 4 ports active throughout the apartment, so I know there's no need for a splitter or anything like that. Thank you in advance for all of your help.imageimage

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dexman
Community Leader
Community Leader

Focusing on the bottom picture, connect the white Ethernet cable to the Ethernet WAN port on the rear of the router.

If Verizon has the Internet pointed at the coaxial port, contact Verizon support to have them shift it to the Ethernet jack on the 211 ONT.

MaslowLover96
Newbie

Just to be clear, I would leave the white Ethernet cable plugged in where it is on top and just unplug it from the ONT? Or would I leave it plugged into the ONT and then plug the other end into the router?

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dexman
Community Leader
Community Leader

The top picture shows the Ethernet cable plugging into a panel. It appears that there is a white colored CAT5e cable punched down on the corresponding 110 block.

Do you know where the other end of the white cable goes?

If it eventually plugs into the router, then nothing really needs to happen physically.

MaslowLover96
Newbie

I do not know for sure where the other end of the punched down cable goes, although I am assuming that it is for the wall jack in my living room as this is where the router is currently set up. My problem is that I want to have more than one wall jack in the apartment active at one time and I was told I can't do that without moving the router to the utility closet as well.

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gs0b
Community Leader
Community Leader

If you have two Ethernet runs to your desired router location, you can use one for the WAN link and the other for a LAN link back to the panel.  Then, install an Ethernet switch in the panel, connect it to the LAN feed from the panel, and then use it's ports to feed the other jacks you want enabled.

If you only have one Ethernet run per room, this won't work.  Either run more Ethernet, or stick the router near the panel.  Note I don't recommend putting the router inside the panel, as that will impact WiFi coverage and may cause heat issues.  Put it nearby and run cables into the panel.

MaslowLover96
Newbie

How do I tell the number of Ethernet runs that I have to my desired router location? Sorry if this is a super basic question. Just moved into this apartment a few days ago and never had to activate Ethernet wall jacks before.

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dexman
Community Leader
Community Leader

Chances are there is one Ethernet jack installed in each room. There may also be jacks for telephone service as well.

If the person who installed the panel & cabling was forward thinking they would have labeled each wallplate with the termination position in the utility room, or documented it for the building owner.

If there are no such labels or documents, the next step would be to move the ONT's Ethernet cable from jack to jack in the Utility Room and then move the router from room to room and document which jack goes where.

MaslowLover96
Newbie

You are correct about one Ethernet port per room with an accompanying telephone jack as well. Whoever installed the panel did not leave any documentation about which ports correspond to which jack. I will update this post as soon as I complete my own documentation of ports.

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gs0b
Community Leader
Community Leader

As Cang_Household recommended, an Ethernet tester will be very helpful here.  If you like building your own test gear, by all means go ahead.  Know that you can buy simple testers for cheap.  These will show you basic connectivity and if wire pairs are swapped.  The cheap ones don't test for performance at speed, just continuity.  But they are exactly what you need.  I found the one below for $10 on Amazon.  You'd be hard pressed to build your own for this little.

https://www.amazon.com/iMBAPrice-Network-Cable-Tester-Phone/dp/B01M63EMBQ

Once  you figure everything out.  Be sure to label it!

Cang_Household
Community Leader
Community Leader

To document the ports, you might want to buy an Ethernet cable finder or tester. If you have spare Ethernet keystones, connectors, some power supply and LEDs, you can create your own DIY tester.