FioS Network Adapter
jedam
Enthusiast - Level 3

Today we received a FioS Network Adapter to enable my wife's computer to access the Internet from her office, replacing the Powerline Networking setup which is prone to losing its Internet connection unpredictably.

The instructions from Verizon say to hook up the FNA and the PC via Ethernet cable, then to connect the FNA to a coax outlet, and finally plug in the power cord. Two green lights should come on, one for the power and the other for the coax.

We are getting the green light for power, but not for the coax. (Not sure how long we need to wait for it to come on.) I know that the Ethernet cable works properly (I unplugged it from another computer) and have tried both different coax cables and different coax outlets, no dice.

In the basement where my office is, we have the Verizon Gateway G1100 but we need some way for her to access the Internet from upstairs. Wireless is ruled out by wife, so we need some kind of wired solution. Powerline networking has proven unreliable as I said, and we'd really rather not start drilling through walls/floors to run Ethernet cable up two stories. The FNA looked like the solution, but we haven't managed to get it to work.

What are we doing wrong? What else should I do to troubleshoot the issue? Is our brand-new FNA simply bad?

Thanks for any tips or suggestions.

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1 Solution
gs0b
Community Leader
Community Leader

You own the cables and 4-way splitter and can do whatever you want with them.

You can simply add a two-way spillter to one of the outputs from the 4-way splitter.  I think the extender ships with one in the box.  If not, you can buy one online or any store that sells TV accessories (Target, Home Depot, โ€ฆ).  If it says 5-1675MHz, youโ€™re good.  A MoCA label is nice, but not required.  Hereโ€™s one I found online:

https://www.amazon.com/Holland-Electronics-GHS-2Pro-M-Splitter-5-1675Mhz/dp/B00P6VHLP0

If you have to crimp connectors onto the cables, itโ€™s not that hard.  You can find the tools online or at Home Depot / Lowes / local hardware store.  You should be able to find tutorials online or find a helpful person at the store.

Good Luck.

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34 Replies
gs0b
Community Leader
Community Leader

Is the G1100 connected to coax?  If not, that's your problem!

Good Luck.

jedam
Enthusiast - Level 3

@gs0b wrote:

Is the G1100 connected to coax?  If not, that's your problem!

Good Luck.


Thanks, yes, the G1100 is connected via coax to the ONT.

Hope this helps in narrowing down the source of the problem.

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gs0b
Community Leader
Community Leader

Make sure both coax jacks are connected to the same coax network.  It sounds like the extenderโ€™s coax jack is not connected to anything.

Do you have TV service?  If so, you can use a TV or set-top-box to test the extenderโ€™s jack.  That will also tell me your G1100โ€™s coax is hooked up properly, as itโ€™s needed for Verizon set-top-boxes to work.

If you do confirm the extenderโ€™s jack is not connected, simply find a place to add a splitter and connect it in.

Good Luck.

jedam
Enthusiast - Level 3

@gs0b wrote:

Make sure both coax jacks are connected to the same coax network.  It sounds like the extenderโ€™s coax jack is not connected to anything.

Do you have TV service?  If so, you can use a TV or set-top-box to test the extenderโ€™s jack.  That will also tell me your G1100โ€™s coax is hooked up properly, as itโ€™s needed for Verizon set-top-boxes to work.

If you do confirm the extenderโ€™s jack is not connected, simply find a place to add a splitter and connect it in.

Good Luck.


This afternoon, I disconnected the coax from the STB in my office (basement) and connected it to the network adapter. What do you know, within a few seconds both lights on the adapter were lit up green!

So now we know that the adapter isn't defective. I'm thinking that what happened is that the coax outlets in the two upstairs rooms that we tried near her office are inactive. (They were put in when the house went up but they've never been used and now we have switched TV service from Comcast to Verizon.)

We do have a working coax outlet at the upstairs TV, but that's at the opposite end of the house and wife has already said that running an Ethernet cable from there to her office would be unsatisfactory.

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gs0b
Community Leader
Community Leader

That's what I thought, the jack the extender was plugged into is not connected to anything.  If you can find the other end and connect into the coax network, you'll be good to go.

Enjoy.

jedam
Enthusiast - Level 3

@gs0b wrote:

That's what I thought, the jack the extender was plugged into is not connected to anything.  If you can find the other end and connect into the coax network, you'll be good to go.

Enjoy.


Thanks for the good wishes. That coax cable disappears into the wall and goes down two floors, so it will be a real challenge figuring out where it leads to. In the basement where the ONT is, the Verizon installer left a forest of coax cables from the original Comcast setup either dangling or threading up to parts unknown. Ouch!

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gs0b
Community Leader
Community Leader

Get a cable tester and you should be able to figure out the rats nest.  Here's one:

https://www.amazon.com/Jonard-CM-8-Cable-Mapper-Length/dp/B00696265Q

Good Luck.

jedam
Enthusiast - Level 3

Wow, that looks promising -- thank you!

Just a follow-up question: the product description says "probe not included," and one of the reviewers writes that "You do need your own wand from a telephone toner." Is that "probe" the same thing as this "wand," and do you know what they're talking about there?

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Edg1
Community Leader
Community Leader

If the coax is not connected it is most likely with the main splitter. Follow the coax coming out of the ONT to wherever the first splitter is and chances are there will be a unterminated coax. The main splitter is likely to be in the basement or outside. Wiring from the second floor is typically ran from the attic down so it is also possible that it is not connected up in the attic. If you have a newer house the cable is probably a homerun from the jack to the main splitter. 

jedam
Enthusiast - Level 3

@Edg1 wrote:

If the coax is not connected it is most likely with the main splitter. Follow the coax coming out of the ONT to wherever the first splitter is and chances are there will be a unterminated coax. The main splitter is likely to be in the basement or outside. Wiring from the second floor is typically ran from the attic down so it is also possible that it is not connected up in the attic. If you have a newer house the cable is probably a homerun from the jack to the main splitter. 




I took a flashlight into the fuse-box closet and took a good, hard look around to see if it was possible to tease out where each line came from and went to. Some lines go out of a 4-way Verizon MoCA splitter and others, as predicted, are just dangling there.

Fortunately, it turns out that the previous installer (Comcast) labeled the wires. There are three ("kitchen," "bed 2" and "bed 4") that aren't connected to anything. The "kitchen" coax is terminated normally, but the other two (and Murphy's Law dictates that these are the ones we need for my wife) are simply cut off at the tip.

So I may be looking at terminating one or both of these cables. How hard is it to do that? Never done anything like it before, don't know if I have the right tools. I have some homework to do. Smiley Happy

The other question is that I would need a splitter that can handle more than 4 lines. Would Verizon be OK with my changing out their splitter? And, what should I be looking for? Here's the info on the front of the Verizon splitter:

Verizon

4-WAY MoCA 2.0 SPLITTER 5-1675 MHz

MMC1004HA

Of the 5 connectors on the splitter, one is labeled "IN" and the other 4 each say "-7dB OUT".

So assuming that I'm allowed to change out this splitter, what should I be looking for to replace it?

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gs0b
Community Leader
Community Leader

You own the cables and 4-way splitter and can do whatever you want with them.

You can simply add a two-way spillter to one of the outputs from the 4-way splitter.  I think the extender ships with one in the box.  If not, you can buy one online or any store that sells TV accessories (Target, Home Depot, โ€ฆ).  If it says 5-1675MHz, youโ€™re good.  A MoCA label is nice, but not required.  Hereโ€™s one I found online:

https://www.amazon.com/Holland-Electronics-GHS-2Pro-M-Splitter-5-1675Mhz/dp/B00P6VHLP0

If you have to crimp connectors onto the cables, itโ€™s not that hard.  You can find the tools online or at Home Depot / Lowes / local hardware store.  You should be able to find tutorials online or find a helpful person at the store.

Good Luck.

jedam
Enthusiast - Level 3

@gs0b wrote:

You own the cables and 4-way splitter and can do whatever you want with them.

You can simply add a two-way spillter to one of the outputs from the 4-way splitter.  I think the extender ships with one in the box.  If not, you can buy one online or any store that sells TV accessories (Target, Home Depot, โ€ฆ).  If it says 5-1675MHz, youโ€™re good.  A MoCA label is nice, but not required.  Hereโ€™s one I found online:

https://www.amazon.com/Holland-Electronics-GHS-2Pro-M-Splitter-5-1675Mhz/dp/B00P6VHLP0

If you have to crimp connectors onto the cables, itโ€™s not that hard.  You can find the tools online or at Home Depot / Lowes / local hardware store.  You should be able to find tutorials online or find a helpful person at the store.

Good Luck.


Great, with this info together with the one @jonjones gave, I think I have all the elements needed to solve the problem!

I'll have to play around with the placing of the new splitter, to make sure that we're still getting strong enough signals everywhere after the changes. There's one outlet where we've had signal-strength issues and I ended up putting in an amplifier.

Thanks to everyone who pitched in with ideas and information. I'm not closing the book officially, in case we run into a snag, but I do want to say I appreciate your help.

gs0b
Community Leader
Community Leader

I'll have to play around with the placing of the new splitter, to make sure that we're still getting strong enough signals everywhere after the changes. There's one outlet where we've had signal-strength issues and I ended up putting in an amplifier.

I'm guessing that  your previous signal problems were on cable, as the ONT puts out a very strong signal.  It can drive lots of splits.  Standard cable amplifiers eat MoCA signals and shouldn't be used, but it is very unlikely that you'll need one.


 

jedam
Enthusiast - Level 3

@gs0b wrote:

I'll have to play around with the placing of the new splitter, to make sure that we're still getting strong enough signals everywhere after the changes. There's one outlet where we've had signal-strength issues and I ended up putting in an amplifier.

I'm guessing that  your previous signal problems were on cable, as the ONT puts out a very strong signal.  It can drive lots of splits.  Standard cable amplifiers eat MoCA signals and shouldn't be used, but it is very unlikely that you'll need one.


 


Yeah, we did have weak signals from Comcast and I had to put in a 10dB amplifier to watch TV in my office. When the Verizon installer came in, he took out the amplifier and said, "Here, you won't be needing this any more." Hopefully that'll hold up when the splitter goes in!

If it turns out that the (further) split signal isn't strong enough, what options would there be for beefing it up?

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Edg1
Community Leader
Community Leader

As gs0b said you definitely won't need a splitter due to the signal strength from the ONT. Don't use an amp because Verizon has special MoCA bypass amps. If you connect a standard cable amp it will block your MoCA.

If you are concerned about the signal to your office then connect the two-port splitter to your ONT one out will connect to your office and the other out will connect to the four-port splitter. This way your office will only be losing -3.5 dB. Everything off the 4 port(-7.5dB) will be at -11dB which is perfectly acceptable. 

jedam
Enthusiast - Level 3

@Edg1 wrote:

As gs0b said you definitely won't need a splitter due to the signal strength from the ONT. Don't use an amp because Verizon has special MoCA bypass amps. If you connect a standard cable amp it will block your MoCA.

If you are concerned about the signal to your office then connect the two-port splitter to your ONT one out will connect to your office and the other out will connect to the four-port splitter. This way your office will only be losing -3.5 dB. Everything off the 4 port(-7.5dB) will be at -11dB which is perfectly acceptable. 


I found the page in the STB diagnostics page that shows the signal strength for the various coax outlets in use. This is at Memu --> Customer Support --> Top Support Tools --> Connected Device Status --> Connecterd Status, then select one of the devices listed, and finally select Advanced Diagnostics.

I'm no expert on this sort of thing, but according to what I saw there, before inserting any new splitter the "OOB Signal Level" for the DVR upstairs is 3.0 dBmV, while the "Inband Signal Power Level" to the same device is 1.0 dBmV. So when we speak of the "dB level" being 1.3dB or -11dB, how does that relate to these "dBmV" readings?

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Edg1
Community Leader
Community Leader

@jedam wrote:

@Edg1 wrote:

As gs0b said you definitely won't need a splitter due to the signal strength from the ONT. Don't use an amp because Verizon has special MoCA bypass amps. If you connect a standard cable amp it will block your MoCA.

If you are concerned about the signal to your office then connect the two-port splitter to your ONT one out will connect to your office and the other out will connect to the four-port splitter. This way your office will only be losing -3.5 dB. Everything off the 4 port(-7.5dB) will be at -11dB which is perfectly acceptable. 


I found the page in the STB diagnostics page that shows the signal strength for the various coax outlets in use. This is at Memu --> Customer Support --> Top Support Tools --> Connected Device Status --> Connecterd Status, then select one of the devices listed, and finally select Advanced Diagnostics.

I'm no expert on this sort of thing, but according to what I saw there, before inserting any new splitter the "OOB Signal Level" for the DVR upstairs is 3.0 dBmV, while the "Inband Signal Power Level" to the same device is 1.0 dBmV. So when we speak of the "dB level" being 1.3dB or -11dB, how does that relate to these "dBmV" readings?


OOB is the out of band signal at 75.25 MHz. That is the frequency that the boxes receive commands. The InBand is the frequency for whatever channel the box is tuned to and will change when you change the channel. The dBmV readings can go to -6 before having any issues. If your Inband band is at 1 dBmV and you add a two port splitter the dBmV will drop to -2.5 which is perfectly acceptable. 

jedam
Enthusiast - Level 3

@Edg1 wrote:

OOB is the out of band signal at 75.25 MHz. That is the frequency that the boxes receive commands. The InBand is the frequency for whatever channel the box is tuned to and will change when you change the channel. The dBmV readings can go to -6 before having any issues. If your Inband band is at 1 dBmV and you add a two port splitter the dBmV will drop to -2.5 which is perfectly acceptable. 

Thanks, I learned something new tonight!

i was going to ask one last question before trying all this out: can I use a regular coax spliter, or is it better to put in a MoCA splitter specifically, like maybe this one? But on re-reading the thread I see that @gs0b had already answered that (basically it's not necessary, but it helps), so I think I'm good to go.

gs0b
Community Leader
Community Leader

Buy a MoCA splitter, they don't cost much more thana non-MoCA splitter and it will save you from having to debug more problems.

jedam
Enthusiast - Level 3

@gs0b wrote:

Buy a MoCA splitter, they don't cost much more thana non-MoCA splitter and it will save you from having to debug more problems.


Will do, thanks!

A big THANK YOU to everyone who helped with information, tips, and links. I'll be back if we run into a problem, but right now it's all looking pretty straightforward.